Publisher:

Templar Books

Book cover - The Book Family Robinson

The Book Family Robinson

The Book Family Robinson tells the story of the bookish Robinson family. Their love of literature goes all the way down to Baby Charlie, who rereads his favourite board book constantly. When they decide to go on a sailing holiday, they make sure to pack up their library to bring with them.

Book cover - World of Food

World of Food

A book about food that contains only one recipe! All those culinary delights and no washing up! The World of Food lifts a lid on everything that can be eaten and digested. From what we eat to where it comes from, this well researched and interesting book will enchant and educate all gastronomes, historians, and budding chefs.

Book Cover - I Say Ooh, You Say Aah

I Say Ooh, You Say Aah

The first page of John Kane’s new picturebook tells readers that there is something very important they have to remember. When the narrator says ‘Ooh’ they must say ‘Aah’. This simple principle of read-and-respond underpins this inventive story and supports a gloriously interactive reading experience. As the story unfolds, Kane asks more and more of his readers, developing the verbal and visual jokes into a genuinely funny climax.

Book Cover - Myths, Monsters and Mayhem in Ancient Greece

Myths, Monsters and Mayhem in Ancient Greece

Myths, Monsters and Mayhem in Ancient Greece delivers just that! Some of the oldest stories ever told, those of the ancient Greeks, are given new life in the comic format of this book – comic in both senses of the word. Woven with the same thread as Terry Deary’s Horrible Histories series, Davies’s retellings are engaging and fun with a large dollop of educational merit thrown in for good measure. Full-colour illustrations do their bit to encourage reluctant readers to give the book a go, and they are duly rewarded.

Book Cover - Ratty's Big Adventure

Ratty's Big Adventure

Ratty’s Big Adventure is inspired by discoveries in 2009 of new species of animals and plants at Mount Bosavi in Papua New Guinea. It is into this unique world that Lara Hawthorne brings her lyrical illustrative style and tender narration of the story of Ratty.

Book Cover - The Little Wooden Robot and the Log Princess

The Little Wooden Robot and the Log Princess

In cartoonist Tom Gauld’s first picturebook for children, a king and queen and their children (a little wooden robot built by the royal inventor and a log princess crafted by the good witch) live happily ever before, until the robot prince forgets to say the ritual magic words that every morning turn his sister from a lump of wood into a little girl.

Book Cover - Little Mole is a Whirlwind

Little Mole is a Whirlwind

Little Mole really is a whirlwind. He can’t stop moving, is always fidgeting, breaks things and constantly forgets what he’s supposed to be doing. His classmates avoid playing with him. Little Mole is ‘wearing so many labels he doesn’t know who he is’. His teacher doesn’t know what to do. His parents, at the end of their rope, eventually find an advert in the paper: Serena the Forest Bunny can make learning fun.

Book Cover - Dear Mr President

Dear Mr President

I love this little book. I am going to send a copy to every adult I know – well every parent maybe – so that they have an excuse to keep it. It is, as they say, so on the money.

Book Cover - The Boy Who Knew Nothing

The Boy Who Knew Nothing

Following The Elephant in the Room, The Boy Who Knew Nothing is the latest book from this successful duo. The sing-song rhythm of the text is matched by the unique look of the illustrations. While the pictures might be an acquired taste for some, others will recognise the Comic Expressionist psychedelia of the 1960s (think Alan Aldridge and Seymour Chwast) with extra- added luminous pink.

Book Cover - I Can't Sleep

I Can't Sleep

I Can’t Sleep addresses the age-old problem of insomnia. Children whose eyes are closing at the dinner table are suddenly wide awake as their head hits the pillow. This book follows the journey of one little girl who tosses and turns and wriggles and rolls as she struggles to fall asleep. She decides to use the tried and trusted remedy of counting sheep. However, these sheep are not the passive jumping-over-the-fence kind. Instead, they come down the chimney covered in soot, leap on the wardrobe and hide under the bed.