Reviewer:

Liz Loughnane

Book Cover - Rita wants a Witch

Rita wants a Witch

This Halloween, Rita wants a witch. She wants a witch that will let her stay up late at night, flying around on a broomstick. Rita’s witch wouldn’t fuss over cleaning or homework – there’s too much marvellous magic to be done! As Rita continues to think about the practicalities of having a witch in her life, she realises that it may not all be fun and games. There are many ways that living with a witch could be disastrous!

Book Cover - Between Tick and Tock

Between Tick and Tock

Between Tick and Tock is a charming tale about a little girl called Liesel and the bustling city that she lives above. Ashling Lindsay illustrates Liesel and her home in the clock tower in warm peachy colours that stand in stark contrast to the greyness of what lies outside her window. Liesel peeks out at the grey, watching the city’s people below as they rush from one thing to the next. They do not stop to say hello or to help each other.

Book Cover - A Thank You Walk

A Thank You Walk

This sweet little book follows a mother and her toddler as they take a walk together. They stroll hand in hand, passing creatures of all shapes and sizes. The characters pause to feed or help the animals and insects that they pass. The birds say ‘chirp-chirp-chirp’ and the pony ‘neigh-neigh-neighs’ with gratitude; this is the heart of the story. The mother translates all of the creature’s sounds for her child. She explains that they are being thanked for their kindness.

Book Cover - It’s Not OK to Feel Blue and other lies

It’s Not OK to Feel Blue and other lies

This anthology is large, in physical size and in the span of its content. These five hundred and fifty-three pages carry an important weight; the weight of vulnerability and shared experiences. It’s Not OK to Feel Blue and other lies is compiled of stories from many different inspirational people, from Yomi Adegoke to Emma Thompson.

Book Cover - The M Word

The M Word

Maggie’s mum is having a hard time. Having recently lost her job, she has taken to staying in the house with the curtains closed all day. Maggie feels the weight of her mum’s sadness and is convinced that she can find a way to cheer her mum up. This mission would be easier if Maggie wasn’t already juggling some very heavy struggles of her own.

Book Cover - Primer

Primer

Writers Jennifer Muro and Thomas Krajewski, alongside artist Gretel Lusky, have created a modern and refreshing new superhero in Primer. Ashley Rayburn has had a tough start in life. She has spent years being moved around foster homes, while her father is pent up in federal prison. Artist Kitch Nolan and scientist Yuka Nolan take Ashley in and give her a fresh start. Things are improving for her, especially when she encounters an enticing suitcase filled with body paints.

Book Cover - Where Bone?

Where Bone?

Balthazar the dog is busy snoozing, dreaming of all the charming things that he and his favourite bone can do together. He is roused from this serene state when he suddenly realises his beloved bone is missing ... WHERE BONE? Balthazar bounces around the house in search of his favourite companion. Readers get a glimpse into Balthazar’s thinking through the text, as he becomes more agitated in his search for his bone. His short, jumping thoughts are exactly as frantic as can be imagined from a rambunctious panicked pup!

Book Cover - Two Can Keep a Secret

Two Can Keep a Secret

After Ellery and her twin brother Ezra move to the close-knit community of Echo Ridge, they quickly begin to discover why their mother rarely visits her hometown. In the past twenty years, there have been two unsolved murders in the neighbourhood. When threatening posters begin to pop up in the area it seems that a third could be on the horizon.

Book Cover - When Sadness Comes To Call

When Sadness Comes To Call

Eva Eland’s first book, When Sadness Comes to Call, uses simple illustrations and text to explain a difficult and sometimes complicated emotion: sadness. Sadness is personified by Eland and illustrated as large and imposing. Its arrival is unexpected, towering over the child character. This story highlights the importance of sitting with Sadness instead of trying to hide from it. The author not only opens up a conversation about Sadness, but also offers practical suggestions of things to do with Sadness when it calls, such as listening to music or going for a walk.